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Przyjęte on 07/10/2014
Sygnatura: 
CCMI/121-EESC-0000

In July 2013, the EESC has adopted an Opinion on Industrial policy in which industrial policy was qualified as a Growth initiative with great potentials. Following up the Opinion it is suggested to discuss somewhat underestimated aspects of the on-going industrial cycle that are vital for future growth and jobs, entailing huge consequences for (manufacturing) industry. It is about the impact of services, digitalisation, ICT and new variations in the same framework - such as 3D printing and other applications (ICT-plus) - on the industrial processes. Services are an increasing part of the European economy, and creating more jobs than manufacturing. The ICT-industry itself is growing in Europe by 10% annually. Services and ICT-plus have huge socio-economic and political implications.

Impact of Business services in industry

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Infopack CCMI/121

W toku (updated on 09/10/2019)
Sygnatura: 
INT/818-EESC-2017

The directive on services in the Internal Market was designed to promote competitiveness, growth and employment in line with the Lisbon Strategy. It has, at the same time, triggered an intensive debate on the form to be taken by the freedom to provide services. The effects of the Directive on national labour markets, social conditions and consumer protection requirements remain a highly controversial issue.

Notatka informacyjna: The services directive in the meat processing sector

Przyjęte on 13/07/2011
Sygnatura: 
INT/568-EESC-2011-1161
Sesja plenarna: 
473 -
Jul 13, 2011 Jul 14, 2011

The EESC considers the Commission's conclusions on the impact of the Services Directive and on the functioning of the services sector to be premature. The directive has been in force for only a few years. Not all the Member States are equally satisfied with the directive and they need to implement it in their own legislation in their own way; these are complicating factors that are not taken into account in the communication. The services sector is large and complex, with many different branches, and it will take time to streamline the single market for services by means of European legislation.

Opinia EKES-u: Single Market for services

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Suivi de la Commission européenne

Przyjęte on 23/04/2015
Sygnatura: 
CCMI/128-EESC-0000

Health and related sectors are a central aspect of human existence and thus attract particular attention of citizens. The sectors of biomedical engineering and the medical and care services industry – including research and development – are among the fastest growing industrial areas, in terms of turnover as well as employment. Under biomedical engineering we understand the bridging between methods of engineering and medicine and biology for diagnostic and therapeutic measures in healthcare – including, among others, biologics and biopharmaceuticals, pharmaceutical drugs, various types of devices for chemical or biological analysis or processing as well as the development of medical equipment and technology for cure, treatment and prevention of disease. The combination of research and development, engineering and industrial production, and medical and care services is particularly important.

 

Biomedical engineering and care services

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Presentation by Prof. Stefan N. Constantinescu

Presentation by Andre Linnenbank, Secretary General of EAMBES

Presentation by Manfred Bammer, MSc, MAS | Head of Biomedical Systems

Presentation by Nicolas Gouze, General Secretary of ETP Nanomedicine

Presentation by Prof. dr. ir. Pascal Verdonck

Presentation by Ruxandra Draghia-Akli Director Health DG Research and Innovation European Commission

Przyjęte on 16/09/2015
Sygnatura: 
CCMI/136-EESC-0000

Digital technologies have reached a degree of maturity that allows their use across a wide range of economic sectors in manufacturing as well as in service industries. According to the 2010 edition of the European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS), more than 50% of the EU workforce use ICT in their daily work, with individual EU Member States reaching rates above 85%. Services sectors are identified as the heaviest users of ICT (for instance, more than 90% of finance employees using ICTS in their daily work), which is to be seen as a natural consequence of the increasing digitalisation of many services – such as eBanking, eCommerce, and online media. 

Effects of digitalisation on service industries and employment (own-initiative opinion)

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