Governanza ekonomika

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  • Debate on 'European responses to strengthen our economies and societies against the background of the current geo-political context'

  • Trillions of euros are needed for Europe's economic recovery. EU proposals for accessible investment data and long-term funding must be more flexible and promote a transparent level playing field, to include more investors and businesses in capital markets.

  • Taxation is a major tool for financing the recovery, as well as the digital and green transition. But the old national and international rules are no longer fit for some of the new business models used today. In an opinion adopted during its March plenary, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) welcomed the European Commission's (EC) proposed Directive on a global minimum level of taxation for multinational groups in the EU. However, the Committee also points out possible shortcomings in the proposal and suggests key additions.

  • In an opinion adopted during its March plenary, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) welcomed the European Commission (EC) proposal to implement the remaining elements of the Basel III international standards in the EU. The aim is to strengthen the resilience of the banking sector while ensuring that it continues to finance economic activity and growth. But the EESC also calls on the EC to find a proper balance between faithful implementation, and the need to reflect the specificities of the EU economy and banks.

  • Ensuring effective and fair taxation across the Single Market is crucial to stimulating a real recovery after the COVID-19 pandemic. In an opinion adopted at its March plenary session, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) supported the European Commission (EC) proposal on the misuse of shell companies for tax purposes. This is purely a tax directive proposal, however, and the Commission needs to dig deeper into the topic, and address other key issues related to shell companies.

  • In an opinion adopted at its plenary session on 23 February, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) welcomed the communication of the European Commission (EC) on this year's Annual Sustainable Growth Survey, outlining the priorities and guiding principles for the 2022 European Semester cycle. The Committee applauded the unprecedented actions of solidarity taken by the EU in dealing with the COVID-19 crisis. The impact on economic activity, however, has been significant, and the level of uncertainty in Europe continues to rise.

  • Taxation is a major tool for meeting public financing needs, as well as for supporting growth and job creation, both during the recovery and in the future, for a green and digital transition in the EU. In an opinion, adopted at its plenary on 23 February, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) welcomed the long-awaited European Commission (EC) initiative on the strategy on business taxation in the 21st century. However, the Committee also points out possible shortcomings and suggests additional key areas to be addressed. 

  • Reference number
    No 07/2022

    The European Commission relaunched the public debate on the review of the EU economic governance framework in October 2021, almost a year after it was put on hold. Following up on this relaunch, the European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) and the European Commission's Directorate-General for Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN) held a joint online conference as part of the public debate. The event, split into two presentations and panel discussions, aimed to engage civil society so as to build consensus on the future of the economic governance framework.

  • EESC plenary debate with Valdis Dombrovskis, Executive Vice-President of the European Commission for An Economy that Works for People

  • In its opinion on the Euro area's economic policy for 2021, the European Economic and Social Committee welcomes the Commission's recommendations, but calls for a shift in fiscal rules towards a more prosperity-oriented form of economic governance, including a golden rule for public investment.