Krievija

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ES un Krievijas koordinācijas komiteja ir EESK iekšējā struktūra, kas atbild par attiecībām ar Krievijas pilsonisko sabiedrību.

Kopš Krievijas Federācijas varas iestādes 2022. gada 24. februārī sāka karu pret Ukrainu, brīva pilsoniskā sabiedrība Krievijā ir apklusināta ar īpašiem likumiem un pieaugošām represijām, savukārt daudzi režīma kritiķi ir bijuši spiesti doties trimdā.

Pašreizējos grūtajos apstākļos EESK ir nolēmusi saglabāt iespējas dialogam ar to Krievijas pilsoniskās sabiedrības daļu, kas iestājas pret karu un atrodas ES teritorijā.

Tas ir devis iespēju auglīgai informācijas un viedokļu apmaiņai par to, kā divpusējām attiecībām būtu jāturpinās pēc kara beigām, un par brīvības un demokrātijas atjaunošanu valstī.

  • Some 25% of the EU population are older citizens, a growing market of economic and social players in the digital age. The European Union faces a new challenge: the coincidence of longevity and widespread digitalisation. Therefore, changing the approach to the "silver economy" is an imperative, says the EESC.  In its opinion “The digital pillar of growth: e-seniors, a potential 25% of the European population” ...

  • Reference number
    51/2016

    According to Eurostat figures, in May 2016 there were 4,197 million unemployed young people (18.6%) in the EU-28. Although an improvement on the previous year (20.3%), the figure remains appalling and shows that the threat of a "lost generation", which has loomed large since the beginning of the economic and financial crisis, is still hanging dangerously over Europe. Despite this, businesses across the EU are struggling to find young people with the skills they need. 

  • Reference number
    47/2016

    After the COP21 in Paris came up with a number of financial commitments by all sorts of national and international donors, EU and African socio-economic stakeholders gathering in Nairobi called for better information on and access to climate-mitigation funding. Members of ...

  • Reference number
    44/2016

    The 1st and inaugural meeting of the EU-Georgia Civil Society Platform (CSP) was held on 16th June 2016 in Tbilisi and was co-chaired by Andrzej Adamczyk, member of the EESC, and Kakha Gogolashvili, chairman of the Georgian National Platform at the Eastern Partnership Civil Society Forum. The participants in the first CSP meeting adopted a joint declaration, assessing the state of play of the EU-Georgia Association Agreement's implementation and acknowledging the considerable progress achieved by Georgia since the beginning of the Association process. Nevertheless, they called ...

  • "The European Economic and Social Committee considers that the participation of Roma at all stages of decision-making is essential for achieving effective policies that can make a real difference to their situation within the EU. However, the tools available today are not sufficient in this regard"

  • Reference number
    21/2016

    How are new forms of employment impacting workers? Is the total flexibility of workers and labour market desirable? Will the sharing economy be putting an end to Europe's social protection systems?

    Today's EESC public hearing, entitled "the changing nature of employment relationships, the sharing economy, zero-hour contracts and the living wage" discussed the growth of non-standard forms of employment in light of workers' protection.

  • ©blackboard1965 / Shutterstock.com
    Reference number
    12/2016

    More than 122 million people in the EU are at risk of poverty or social exclusion[1]

    The European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) has adopted an opinion urging the EU Council to stick to its commitment to get at least 20 million people out of poverty by 2020. The EESC adopted its opinion on fighting poverty (Rapporteur: Seamus Boland, Co-Rapporteur: Marjolijn Bulk), requested by the Dutch Presidency of the Council, during its plenary session on 18 February 2016. To achieve the EU's target, Member States need to launch their own national strategies to fight poverty, social exclusion and discrimination, supported by a common European framework. These strategies should focus on adequate income support, inclusive labour markets, quality jobs, equal access to affordable high quality services for all, including migrants and people granted asylum.  

     

  • Reference number
    01/2016

    33 schools from across Europe selected to come to Brussels to discuss migration

    The European Economic and Social Committee (EESC) has selected 33 secondary schools from across Europe to participate in this year's edition of Your Europe Your Say! which will take place in Brussels on 17-19 March 2016. One school from each of the 28 EU Member States and the 5 candidate countries, for the first time from Albania, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, and Turkey, were chosen from over 400 applications.

  • The results are in. After an impressive 428 applications to take part in Your Europe, Your Say! (YEYS) 2016, 33 schools from 28 EU Member States and five candidate countries have been selected to take part. We are thrilled that so many young people have expressed interest in this exciting event, and we can’t wait to meet the winning schools and students in March.

  • Copyright Andreas Reeg
    Reference number
    71/2015

    More than 120 million people in the EU face the risk of poverty or social exclusion[1]

    Grassroots organisations working to alleviate poverty in Germany, Ireland, France, Poland and Finland show the way in providing direct assistance to those in need.  The European Economic and Social Committee has dedicated the 2015 European Civil Society Prize to organisations distinguishing themselves through their creativity and success in combatting poverty.

    Poverty and social exclusion includes many multi-faceted challenges such as housing, health, education, access to employment, indebtedness and addiction, to name but a few. Civil society organisations across the European Union are actively addressing these issues.  Activities often focus on local needs and – crucially – directly involve people experiencing poverty themselves in their implementation.