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21/06/2017
Politiques sociales, Autres

Reform of social security financing – Opinion No. 2,039 (Joint opinion of the National Labour Council and the Central Economic Council)

    Reform of social security financing – Opinion No. 2,039 (Joint opinion National Labour Council and Central Economic Council)

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15/07/2022
Economie et finances

Research Paper 24_Exploring Place-based Opportunities for Policy and Practice in Transition
Delivering effective regional development in a context of decarbonising the economy is not just challenging economically but raises the issue of social justice and equity. Ensuring a ‘just transition’ that appropriately addresses the needs and harnesses the potential of particular communities is therefore critical. This research paper explores placebased approaches to just transition in Ireland and the potential for adopting co-creation methodologies to identifying and implementing pathways to change. It draws on three case studies to understand perspectives on, and pathways towards, more climate-resilient and equitable futures in three areas outside the major metropolitan areas.

    Exploring Place-based Opportunities for Policy and Practice in Transition

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30/11/2021
Politique Intrenationale

Research Paper 23_Perspectives on Micro-Generation: Public Participation in the Low-Carbon Transition in Ireland (MISTRAL)
Mistral is an innovative training and support network for 15 doctoral researchers in relation to renewable energy and social acceptance operating in 6 countries: United Kingdom, Portugal, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, and Ireland. It is a three-year project funded from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under a Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant. NESC is a partner in the MISTRAL programme. The network and overall project is led by Council Member, Prof Geraint Ellis, Queens University Belfast. NESC has provided a secondment opportunity for two doctoral researchers with posts in QUB. Senni Määttä was seconded to NESC as a visiting researcher from September to October 2021. The paper produced during the secondment explores stakeholder views on micro-generation as expressed through the Irish Micro-Generation Scheme consultation process. It focuses on prosumers and microgeneration as part of the active participation of individuals in the low-carbon transition. The paper’s findings can help to inform the development of microgeneration policy with the final scheme, but it also provides insights into the value and challenges of public policy consultation.

    Perspectives on Micro-Generation: Public Participation in the Low-Carbon Transition in Ireland (MISTRAL)

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12/04/2021
Changement Industriel

Research Paper 22_Long-term Resilient and Sustainable Cities A Scoping Paper
City resilience is seen as a city capability to recover from large events, such as natural hazards, and to positively manage ongoing city “stressors,” such as the climate crisis, demographic change, social inequality, unemployment, and poverty. While the term ‘resilient city’ has its origins in dealing with natural disasters, its use now extends to a number of independent but interacting resilient domains, such as social resilience; economic resilience; community capital; institutional resilience; infrastructure resilience; and environmental resilience.

    Long-term Resilient and Sustainable Cities A Scoping Paper

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25/03/2021
Economie et finances, Politiques sociales

Research Paper 21_Gender and Covid-19 in Ireland
This paper outlines data on a number of gender impacts of Covid-19 in Ireland in 2020. It describes the outcomes from the pandemic for women and men in the areas of employment, domestic work and childcare, finance and state income supports, well-being, health and decision-making. It also outlines ways in which some groups experience overlapping negative impacts.

    Gender and Covid-19 in Ireland

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02/03/2021
Stratégies locales

Research Paper 20_Challenges and Opportunities for Rural Ireland and the Agricultural Sector
There is a prevailing narrative around the decline of rural areas in Ireland. This is not unique to the Irish context with international studies also looking at concerns around rural vitality. This narrative is associated predominately with a decline in the agricultural sector, urbanisation and the decline of opportunities in rural areas. This paper aims to quantitatively establish how rural areas have changed and qualitatively identify opportunities based on a group of an expert group.

    Challenges and Opportunities for Rural Ireland and the Agricultural Sector

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24/03/2021
Economie et finances

Research Paper 19_Economic Resilience in Sustainable Communities: Innovative Approaches in Public Spending to Maximise Local Benefits
The Government of Ireland, as with all governments across Europe, faces a triple challenge of recovery from the economic crisis brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, the urgent need for action on climate change and ensuring a just transition to a zero-carbon society so that opportunities and burdens are equally distributed. This paper asks whether it is possible to align the recovery from the economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the necessity to take climate action with innovative local wealth building approaches, to catalyse enhanced local sustainable development, in particular in rural communities. The public health crisis has exposed shortcomings in local economies across Ireland, with rural communities impacted hardest by the economic impacts of the crisis , while the importance of active citizenship to the national response has underscored importance of resilient communities.

    Economic Resilience in Sustainable Communities: Innovative Approaches in Public Spending to Maximise Local Benefits

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05/01/2021
L'immigration

Research Paper 18_The Impacts of Covid-19 on Ethnic Minority and Migrant Groups in Ireland
This paper outlines key impacts of Covid-19 on ethnic minority and migrant groups in Ireland. It presents an overview of available data, and identifies areas for further work. The paper provides some contextual information first, followed by an outline of issues arising for ethnic minority and migrant groups in relation to Covid-19 in the areas of employment and income, housing, health and well-being, education, immigration services, and discriminatory attitudes. A number of the problematic issues arising for these groups during the pandemic stem from pre-existing disadvantage experienced by migrants and Irish people of colour. However a range of supports have been put in place which aim to address some of the issues which negatively affect migrants and ethnic minorities during the pandemic.

    The Impacts of Covid-19 on Ethnic Minority and Migrant Groups in Ireland

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04/11/2020
Autres

Research Paper 17_Energy Transition Pathways and the COVID-19 Pandemic: An analysis of the ‘green recovery’ responses in Denmark and Ireland
Multi-sectoral approaches to Innovative Skills Training for Renewable energy And social acceptance (MISTRAL): Mistral is an innovative training and support network for 15 doctoral researchers in relation to renewable energy and social acceptance operating in 6 countries: United Kingdom, Portugal, Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, and Ireland. It is a three year project funded from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under a Marie Skłodowska-Curie grant The network and overall project is led by Council Member, Prof Geraint Ellis, Queens University Belfast. NESC is a partner in the MISTRAL programme. It is funded by the European Commission under the Innovative Training Network. NESC will provide a secondment opportunity for two doctoral researchers with posts in QUB. Alex Miller was seconded to NESC as a visiting researcher from June to September 2020. His project explored current energy policy and practice for two countries within the uncertainty of Covid-19. This is the resulting research paper titled ‘Energy transition pathways and the COVID-19 pandemic: An analysis of the ‘green recovery’ responses in Denmark and Ireland’.

    Energy Transition Pathways and the COVID-19 Pandemic: An analysis of the ‘green recovery’ responses in Denmark and Ireland

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07/05/2020
Stratégies locales

Research Paper 16_Modelling the Zero-Carbon Transition: International Approaches and Lessons for Ireland
The Government’s Climate Action Plan and Future Jobs Ireland 2019 included a request for NESC’s advice on how to manage the transition associated with climate change and digital automation. Specifically, how to minimise the impact on any vulnerable workers and sectors, and how to seize opportunities. Government policy is intended to lead the low-carbon transition, by incentivising the innovation, diffusion and adoption of primarily energy-related low-carbon technologies. The zero-carbon transition is a form of socio-economic transition, involving major changes over decadal timescales in buildings, energy and transport systems. The principle of a just transition means no groups are left behind. A key question for policy-makers then is ‘which sectors and workers are vulnerable in transitions?’. The problem of identifying the most vulnerable groups and sectors in the economy during a low-carbon or digital transition is complex. Quantitative models of the economy and energy system are often applied to determine appropriate responses to climate change in the energy sector, assess the impact of policy proposals on the economy and identify vulnerable groups during transitions. Several different theories and perspectives should be used to approach the problem. Such insights are crucial to a just transition, and international approaches and lessons for Ireland are explored here. This research paper was an input to, and should be read in conjunction with, Council Report no 149: Addressing Employment Vulnerability as Part of a Just Transition in Ireland.

    Modelling the Zero-Carbon Transition: International Approaches and Lessons for Ireland

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