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19/06/2019
Transport and Communication

Secretariat Paper 18_Urban Structure, Spatial Planning and Climate Emissions
This Secretariat paper examines the relationship between urban structure, spatial planning and climate emissions, in particular transport-related emissions. The paper focuses in particular on the some of the key literature that has sought to analysis this relationship. The paper also considers the case for developing new approaches to evaluating the impact of urban structure and spatial planning on supporting sustainable development and reducing transport-related emissions. The paper concludes with a focus on the enabling role of urban structure with regards to sustainable mobility

    Urban Structure, Spatial Planning and Climate Emissions

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13/06/2019
Transport and Communication

Research Paper 14_Transport-Orientated Development: Assessing Opportunity for Ireland: Background Case Studies
This background paper provides an analysis of international and national evidence on the role of transport in widening the potential of active land management through unlocking land for housing, sustainable urban development, and regeneration. The key points were summarised in the main document Transport-Orientated Development: Assessing Opportunity for Ireland (NESC, 2019). This background paper provides instructive cases of transport-orientated development (TOD), in some shape or form, examined here to reveal generalisable lessons for any such strategy in Ireland. The fictional TOD garden city known as Uxcester is also examined as an example of a model for the development of these types of cities involving investment in transport. It was proposed in an essay that won first prize in the 2014 Wolfson Economics Prize competition. The experience of regional planning in Cork including plans to develop a rail corridor is also examined. The paper concludes with the report of a field-study visit to Nantes in France.

    Transport-Orientated Development: Assessing Opportunity for Ireland Background Case Studies

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12/06/2019
Transport and Communication

Transport-Orientated Development: Assessing the Opportunity for Ireland (148)
What if urban development made it easier to use public transport, and cycle or walk to work and school? The State must build on the vision set out in Project Ireland 2040 to maximise the number of homes, jobs, public services and amenities which are close to frequent, high-quality transport services. This is the message from the National Economic and Social Council (NESC) who today publish a new report No.148, Transport-Orientated Development: Assessing Opportunity for Ireland. Reaching the strategic objectives of compact growth and sustainable mobility will require further specific decisions to create such development at key locations, new institutional arrangements and tailored funding mechanisms.

    Transport-Orientated Development: Assessing the Opportunity for Ireland

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24/05/2019
Transport and Communication

Research Paper 13_Advancing the Low-Carbon Transition in Irish Transport
This research from DCU identifies three main themes: complexities inherent in transport; competing priorities and contestation between institutional drivers; and the fragmented governance landscape and institutional opportunities for enhanced co-ordination. Building on research findings, the report identifies a set of recommendations and poses a number of questions for stakeholders who wish to strengthen low-carbon transition in Irish transport.

    Advancing the Low-Carbon Transition in Irish Transport

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22/05/2019
Climate Change

Climate-Change Policy: Getting the Process Right (147)
There is a growing consensus that ambitious action is needed if we are to stop climate change. Ireland is ready to do more as evident from the efforts of our children and young people, as well as the Oireachtas Joint Committee’s report and ongoing work to produce an all-of-Government plan. To safeguard our future, protect coming generations, achieve a just transition and meet international obligations, actions have to urgently and continuously deliver results. This report focuses on how to combine an ambitious long-term climate change mission with an urgent and active policy process that can discover, try out and support practical actions that reduce carbon emissions.

    Climate-Change Policy: Getting the Process Right

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23/04/2019
Climate Change

Secretariat Paper 17_The Framing of Climate Action in Ireland: Strategic Considerations
Climate change is one of the most pressing issues facing policy-makers today, and Ireland’s record on climate action is widely accepted as being disappointing. Part of the explanation for this lies in the uncertainty about what action Ireland can and should take, and uncertainty about how acceptable any climate action will be to various groups in society. In this context of uncertainty, how a problem is framed can have a significant impact on subsequent decisions taken to address that problem. This Secretariat paper examines if and how the framing (or reframing) of climate action can lead to more progress in this challenging area.

    The Framing of Climate Action in Ireland: Strategic Considerations

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29/11/2018
Climate Change

Secretariat Paper 16_Multistakeholder Agreements in Climate Governance and Energy Transition: The Dutch Energy Agreement
This Secretariat paper examines national multistakeholder agreements in energy and climate governance. These refer to negotiated agreements setting out national long-term energy and climate objectives which include a range of stakeholders, from social, economic and environmental actors to political parties. The paper focuses in particular on the 2013 Dutch Energy Agreement between the social partners, environmental groups, government and local authorities. Political agreements have been used in other countries, including Sweden and Denmark. The paper explores some of the drivers, characteristics and processes in the development of this Dutch Energy Agreement, with a view to gaining further understanding the potential value of multistakeholder agreements as strategic tools for the low carbon transition.

    Multistakeholder Agreements in Climate Governance and Energy Transition: The Dutch Energy Agreement

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27/06/2018

Research Paper 12_Low Work Intensity Households and the Quality of Supportive Services: Detailed Research Report
This NESC Research paper is the detailed research to NESC report No.146 'Moving from Welfare to Work: Low Work Intensity Households and the Quality of Supportive Services'. It examines the experiences of low work intensity households and the services they interact with, through 92 interviews with households, service provider organisations, employers, senior officials in government departments and agencies, and national stakeholder organisations.

    Low Work Intensity Households and the Quality of Supportive Services: Detailed Research Report

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25/06/2018

Moving from Welfare to Work: Low Work Intensity Households and the Quality of Supportive Services (146)
Moving from Welfare to Work, finds that Ireland’s social welfare and employment support system, e.g. Intreo does reasonably well in supporting people into paid work, but there is a need to have a greater focus on the household. This means encouraging and supporting into jobs partners of people who are unemployed, lone parents, people with a disability and their carers who wish to enter employment.

    Moving from Welfare to Work: Low Work Intensity Households and the Quality of Supportive Services

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25/04/2018

Urban Development Land, Housing and Infrastructure: Fixing Ireland's Broken System (145)
The State must drive the provision of housing and urban development. The Irish housing system is speculative, volatile and expensive. The urban land system is dysfunctional: land is not available in appropriate locations at a cost that will allow affordable housing to be provided. This is the message from the National Economic and Social Council (NESC) in this report.

    Urban Development Land, Housing and Infrastructure: Fixing Ireland's Broken System

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25/04/2018

Secretariat Paper 14_International Approaches to Land Use, Housing and Urban Development
This NESC Secretariat paper on international approaches to housing, land use and urban development is one of two secretariat papers prepared in conjunction with a NESC report No.145 on 'Urban Development Land, Housing and Infrastructure: Fixing Ireland’s Broken System'. The other Secretariat paper (No.13) is on 'Land Value Capture and Urban Public Transport'.

    International Approaches to Land Use, Housing and Urban Development

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24/01/2018

Secretariat Paper 13_Land Value Capture and Urban Public Transport
This secretariat paper on international approaches to ‘Land Value Capture and Urban Public Transport’ is one of two secretariat papers prepared as part of a NESC study on ‘Land Use, Land Value and Urban Development’ (NESC Report No.145).

    Land Value Capture and Urban Public Transport

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22/11/2017

Secretariat Paper 12_Reflections on Infrastructure Policy and Institutional Developments in the UK
This paper describes and reflects on the evolution of the UK’s approach to infrastructure policy and planning. The purpose is to help inform the development of Irish infrastructure policy as we return to higher levels of investment. The paper focuses on institutional and governance issues: how infrastructure plans are formulated, and how policy decisions are made, responded to by stakeholders, implemented, maintained and evaluated.

    Reflections on Infrastructure Policy and Institutional Developments in the UK

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25/10/2017

Moving Towards the Circular Economy in Ireland (144)
This report finds that there is momentum in circular economy practices in Ireland, but action is needed to build on the early advantage. This report highlights some of the leaders in the Irish circular economy, whose products and services keep resources in use for longer, extract the maximum value from them and recover products and materials. The report includes ten case studies of businesses and social enterprises. The research, by Dr Simon O’Rafferty, highlights the opportunities available for businesses and social enterprises, while drawing attention to the regulatory and social challenges in facilitating the transition to a circular economy.

    Moving Towards the Circular Economy in Ireland

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26/04/2017

The Dynamics of Environmental Sustainability and Local Development: Aquaculture (143)
There is great potential for Ireland to develop its aquaculture in the coming decade, with a rich and varied marine landscape, and a long coastline. However, the sector is small in scale, relative to Scotland or Norway, and has been in decline somewhat over the last decade, as it has been across Europe. Sustainable Development in Irish Aquaculture (NESC report No. 143), argues that future Irish aquaculture development can be achieved that balances economic, environmental and social goals. The report, which includes a qualitative study on sustainable development in Irish aquaculture, was commissioned by NESC as part of its sustainability remit. The research, by Dr Patrick Bresnihan, examines how the dynamics of environmental sustainability have been experienced and managed within Irish aquaculture.

27/04/2016

Research Series 11_Valuing Nature–Perspectives and Issues

26/04/2016

Research Series 10_Nature’s Values: From Intrinsic to Instrumental

25/03/2016

Research-Series 9_The Burren Life Programme: An Overview

31/07/2015
Economy and Finance, Local Policies, Others, Social Policies

Housing Supply and Land: Driving Public Action For The Common Good (142)
Ireland urgently needs to resume construction and supply of affordable new homes. Our competitiveness, ability to create jobs and social inclusion can be damaged by the low level of supply and high cost of homes.Endorsing the Government’s identification of affordability as a primary goal of housing policy, the National Economic and Social Council (NESC) yesterday provided Government with a report on housing supply and land management. The Council emphasises the importance of not returning to the speculative and unstable system of home building, which proved unaffordable, unsustainable, ineffective and ultimately economically and socially damaging.

24/07/2015

Research Series 8_Socially Integrated Housing and Sustainable Urban Communities: Case Studies from Dublin

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