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12/01/2005

Riforma del sistema pensionistico:quali soluzioni per la previdenza complementare?

12/01/2005
Economy and Finance

Finland's Competence, Opennessand Renewability -Summary of the 'Finland in the Global Economy' Report
Globalization refers to the integration of the world economy, mainly characterized by rapidgrowth in flows of trade, capital and technology between countries. Globalization also hasconsiderable cultural and political ramifications. The globalization report focuses on exploringhow Finnish production and work can succeed in circumstances that have changed and arecontinuing to change rapidly.

01/01/2005
Labour

"Issues concerning employees of the State, the legal entities of the public sector and the local Authorities" - (Draft Law)
The Draft Law of the Ministry of the Interior, Public Administration and Decentralisation deals with various issues concerning the operation and modernisation of public administration, extending to personnel matters.

31/12/2004
Economy and Finance

Finland's competence, openness and renewabilityThe final report of the "Finland in the Global Economy" project
The report examines the challenges faced by Finland in the new phase of globalization and how these challenges should be met. The report outlines a strategy through which Finland can use the new opportunities afforded by globalization and combat the threats of tightening competition. The strategy is based on improving competence, on increasing openness in the economy and in society, and above all on renewal. The report focuses on proposals for strengthening the education and innovation systems. The functioning of the commodity and labour markets is also discussed, with proposals for improvement.

28/12/2004
Others

Advisory Report 2004/13 - Vocational education and training in regional networks: Advisory report on the Cabinet's mid-range policy on Vocational Education and Training (VET) in the Netherlands
The Cabinet is advancing a new governance system that will give schools more leeway to select their own profile, thereby allowing them to respond more effectively to the wishes of participants (in particular their pupils) and to key into the demand for education in their area of authority, in consultation with their regional partners. The Social and Economic Council agrees with the main points and targets of the Cabinet?s proposed policy on vocational education and training. To achieve these targets, however, the government must become more pro-active. It is important that it continues to involve itself in the content of education and that it identifies performance targets for the sector. The government should actively support reform in vocational education and training and intervene if the reform measures prove ineffectual. The Council also believes it is the government?s task to encourage the active involvement of trade and industry in vocational education and to see that schools and businesses actually commit to any agreements they make.

27/12/2004
International Policies

Advisory Report 2004/12 : The pending enlargement of the EU, with particular emphasis on the accession of Turkey
In this advisory report, the Social and Economic Council has taken it upon itself to draw attention to some important socio-economic issues associated with the accession of Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey. The report focuses mainly on Turkey because the decision-making process on that country's membership is still at an early stage. Moreover, Turkey is the largest of the candidate member states in terms of both population and size. A final argument for doing so is that the public debate on Turkey's accession to the EU has been dominated by ideological and political aspects, with the consequence that socio-economic aspects have been overshadowed.

23/12/2004
Social Policies

Advisory Report 2004/11 - Evaluation of Cabinet proposals to modify eligibility requirements for benefits under the Unemployment Insurance Act
Different opinions of Social and Economic Councils on proposals to modify eligibility requirements for benefits under the Unemployment Insurance Act

22/12/2004
Labour, Social Policies

REPORT 03/2004 on temporary employment in the public sector
This report on temporality in public employment was adopted by the Economic and Social Council with 38 votes in favour, 2 against and 2 abstentions. It was commis-sioned by the government in July 2004 with a view to tackling this serious problem.Regarding the rise in the rate of temporary employment in the public sector, the Council points out that ?from any perspective, the percentage is excessive in respect of what might be a reasonable or necessary use by public administration of outsourced staff to meet temporary, unforeseen, extraordinary or urgent needs.? Public employment has tended to grow considerably in the past two decades. In just over fifteen years, employment in public administration as a whole has risen to a total of some 2.8 million. Currently the Autonomous Communities employ over half of all pub-lic servants, the local authorities 20 per cent, and central government 17 per cent. More-over, a large portion of public employment created in recent years has been taken up by women, so the balance between male and female employees is now practically even.The growth in public employment has been accompanied by a sharp rise in the propor-tion of temporary contracts, so that the current rate for public administration as a whole (22.8 per cent) is more than double that of 1987. This rise was sharpest in the last period of economic expansion. Between 1997 and 2003, the rate of temporary employment in the public sector went up by 6.6 points, contrasting with the trend in the private sector, which saw a drop of 6 points.The rate of temporary employment varies widely among the various tiers of public ad-ministration. The highest rates are in local government, at 29.7 per cent, followed by the Autonomous Communities with 23 per cent, and central government with just 13 per cent. The temporary employment rate is 29 per cent in the health service and 22 per cent in education.One notable feature of temporality in public employment is its higher incidence in women, chiefly in sectors such as education and health, and in local government. An-other feature is that temporary services in the public sector have tended to be provided over longer periods, bearing out the conclusion that temporary employment is quite of-ten meeting structural needs in public administration.The problem of temporary public employment needs to be addressed with a thorough review of the policy of outsourcing services and activities currently followed by the various tiers of government. This review should lead to a clear definition of which ac-tivities and services may be outsourced and which should remain under direct public management.This Council report follows other recent surveys and analyses of temporary employment in the public sector by other institutions and bodes, highlighting the increasing and widespread concern about the problem. All have a common conclusion, which the Council wishes particularly to emphasize: the existence of growing and excessive tem-porality in public employment, in excess of what would be justified by the needs of public administration to guarantee services in the event of technical, temporary and ur-gent requirements.It will not be possible to achieve the aim of reducing the excessive temporality in public employment without the adoption of measures for coordination and cooperation be-tween the various tiers of government and the social partners in order to establish and implement integrated and coherent actions.

22/12/2004
Labour

Advisory report : Employees should be able to report malpractice without fear of reprisal
Employees who suspect malpractice in the company they work for should be able to report their suspicions in a safe and satisfactory manner, for instance by reporting them to an independent intermediary or organisation. The code of practice drawn up by the Labour Foundation eighteen months ago on this topic merits follow-up. An independent committee such as that found in the public sector is not necessary for the private sector. Similarly, employers and employees should not be made responsible for developing compensatory measures or creating a fund for whistleblowers.

21/12/2004
Labour, Social Policies

Apprenticeship in professions performed by wage earners - Project of royal decree modifying the royal decree of 19 August 1998 determining the maximum of the apprenticeship indemnity - opinion 1502

21/12/2004
Labour, Social Policies

Tripartite declaration of principles concerning multinational enterprises and social policy - report 64

21/12/2004
Labour

Paid public holidays - Proposition of law fixing the first replacement day at the date of a community day - opinion 1504

21/12/2004
Labour, Social Policies

Parental leave - Propositions of the council of ministers at Raversijde - opinion 1498

21/12/2004
Labour

Evaluation of casual work in the hospitality business - opinion 1505

21/12/2004
Labour

Project of royal decree modifying the royal decree of 18 July 2002 holding measures aimed at promoting employment in the non-profit sector and containing various measures -opinion 1501

21/12/2004
Agricultural Policies, Labour

ILO - 93rd session of the International Labour Conference (June 2005) - Report V(1) - Work in the fishing sector - opinion - 1503

21/12/2004
Labour

Simplification and modernisation of the social records to be kept by employers - Sectoral derogations - Monitoring -opinion 1499

21/12/2004
Labour

Indemnity fund for workers laid off in the event of the closure of an enterprise - Employers contributions for 2005 - opinion 1497

15/12/2004
Lisbon Strategy - Growth and Jobs

Advisory Report 2004/10 - Evaluating the Lisbon Strategy
The core of the Lisbon strategy involves making the Member States of the European Union into dynamic and competitive, knowledge-based economies. The public interest is served by doing so, as a modern knowledge-based economy can offer present and future generations greater opportunities for prosperity, with a better quality of life for as many people as possible while respecting social and cultural values and the natural environment. This development model requires a clearly defined growth agenda based on a higher labour participation rate and sustained growth in labour productivity. The growth agenda can only succeed if all the parties involved (the Member States, the European Union, and the social partners) commit themselves to it. A modern knowledge-based economy must also be a competitive economy. At EU level, this will require a well-functioning internal market; at national level, it will require reforms and social innovation, for example with respect to the labour market. Such changes require a better-educated, better-trained labour force and measures that offer employees and citizens social protection. Cohesion between the economic and social dimensions of policy are vital if the European development model is to be viable.

14/12/2004

Contrattazione, retribuzioni e costo del lavoro in Italia, nel contesto europeo. 2002-2003

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